homepage home
subscribe to California Construction magazine subscribe
newsletters free e-newsletter
advertise
industry jobs industry jobs
Dodge Data & Analytics
California Construction Logo
Order Your RISK FREE Subscription
comment

Best Projects, Government/Public Buildings: New Courthouse in Session in Remote Locale

Text size: A A

A contemporary civic building in a forested setting at an elevation of 8,000 ft in Mono County, the 20,000-sq-ft courthouse includes two courtrooms, space for new judicial services, security protocols and access to court services, secure parking for judges and holding cells for prisoners.

Photo Courtesy of Tim Griffith
----- Advertising -----

The Sacramento office of Sundt Construction, the general contractor, began the $14.95-million project in April 2010 and delivered the two-story building in July 2011. Its scope included site preparation, underground utilities, landscape, hardscape, vehicular drives, surface parking, security barriers, fencing and gates.

The contemporary design incorporates three flat-roofed elements on a steel-frame structure with exterior finishes of brick, glass and weathered Corten steel. A prow projects beyond the building along the town's main street, defining an area for a future courtroom.

Inside, the wedge-shaped public circulation spine, with its highly visible glass curtain wall extending the length of the east facade, creates circulation space at the entry while minimizing it at the end of the public corridor.

Mammoth Lakes' high altitude, annual average snowfall of 35 ft and remoteness—the nearest large city, Reno, Nev., is three hours away—required a customized plan for the challenging terrain.

For that reason, the Sundt team selected subcontractors experienced in the Mammoth area and its attendant logistics for supplies. In addition, a fast-track approach, with 10-hour days, six days a week, at no added cost to the owner, ensured an enclosed building before the first snowstorm. That allowed interior work to proceed through the winter. As a result, the team delivered the project on time, within budget and without accidents—despite a record 55 ft of snow that year.

"We developed good trust and respect throughout our team," says Ron Deal, the project manager for Sundt Construction. "When we had an issue to deal with, everyone dug in and helped determine the best solution quickly. Getting hung up on even a small thing could have jeopardized our plan."

The architect designed the courthouse to LEED Silver standards, although the client chose not to apply for certification. The design team considered shape and orientation to provide optimal energy conditions as well as forest and mountain views. Natural wind stripping at the entrance improves energy efficiency. The flat roof allows snow accumulation to increase insulation in winter and its drains prevent formation of icicles.

Mammoth Lakes Courthouse

Mammoth Lakes

Key Players

Owner: Administrative Office of the Courts, Sacramento

Contractor: Sundt Construction, Sacramento

Lead Design: Mark Cavagnero Assoc. Architects, San Francisco

Structural Engineer: Forell/Elsesser Engineers, San Francisco

MEP Engineer: Gayner Engineers, San Francisco

Landscape Architect: AECOM, San Francisco

Civil Engineer: Triad/Holmes Associates, Mammoth Lakes

Lighting Designer: Auerbach Pollock Friedlander, San Francisco

Acoustical Consultant: Charles M. Salter Assoc., San Francisco

Threat Assessment: TEECOM Design Group, Oakland

Submitted by Sundt Construction

Keywords:

----- Advertising -----
New Blog: Vertically Speaking in Northern California
New Blog: Field Notes
Reader Photos
Photos from California Construction Photo Showcase
Dodge Lead Center
Search for local construction projects OR CALL 877-234-4246 and get a FREE Lead Now!
Search by Project Type & State





----- Advertising -----
 Reader Comments:

Sign in to Comment

To write a comment about this story, please sign in. If this is your first time commenting on this site, you will be required to fill out a brief registration form. Your public username will be the beginning of the email address that you enter into the form (everything before the @ symbol). Other than that, none of the information that you enter will be publically displayed.

We welcome comments from all points of view. Off-topic or abusive comments, however, will be removed at the editors’ discretion.